Wearable Devices on the Rise in the Workplace

The incorporation of wearables within employee wellness programs are on the rise, as employers are seeking to keep organizational costs down and gather insight to help promote and benefit the wellness of their employees.
Employers Using Wearables to Monitor Health
A 2017 survey conducted by Springbuk, an Indianapolis based health analytics software company, revealed that 35 percent of employers in the US are using wearables to monitor health and calibrate their wellness initiatives. Respondents were comprised of employers, benefit consultants, and wellness vendors that participated in the Healthiest Employer” Award Program that encompasses over 8,000 employers nationally.
The remaining employers in the survey planned to have a plan in place to onboard wearables within a year. This is a drastic shift in thinking when just a few years ago, many felt that wearable health devices were just a novelty that wouldn’t gain any traction amongst employers because many users hadn’t become accustomed to the everyday use of devices. Devices were great at tracking steps, but didn’t provide much engagement outside of your basic activity data.
B.Y.O.D (Bring Your Own Device) 
There are a variety of different wearable devices on the market now and selecting the best one depends on what the individual’s usage will be with the device. Instead of purchasing a standard device to distribute to employees, more employers are allowing a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) approach to not force a new device of technology on individuals who have already gotten accustomed with their preferred tracker.
Data Helps with Strategic Wellness Program Planning
The data gained from these devices have been used to deliver insights to employers about how to invest revenue towards wellness initiatives. When choosing a device to support their wellness programs, 60 percent of employers prioritized app usability.
 
44.1 percent of the employers surveyed used the device data in strategic planning of their wellness program. These programs had an employee participation rate of 83.8 percent, a 61.9 percent change in health risks. Some other metrics used by employers include a 52.7 improvement in employee clinical outcomes, changes in financial outcomes in regards to medical plans (58.7%), and impact of productivity and performance (22.5%). 

The
MoveSpring platform allows employers to aggregate device data to assess their employees activity and create reports to analyze data for strategic planning for their wellness program. Administrators are able to create and implement step challenges, provide content that educates and motivates employees on additional benefits the company offers to help them stay healthy.
Conclusion 
While we’re still in the early stages of the overall impact that wearables can have in the workplace, they don’t appear to be falling to the wayside anytime soon. To see how MoveSpring can help boost your current wellness program, stop by movespring.com to request a demo.

Can Workplace Workouts Work for You?

For many in the workforce, there are simply not enough hours in the day, especially to commute to a gym before or after work. With this in mind, any workplace wellness program – space permitting – could benefit from wellness initiatives with physical activity components.

Onsite Wellness Programs

The advantages of an onsite program would benefit those looking to get a quality workout in. This gives workers the opportunity to be active during their lunches or after their workday is complete. Employers could even incentivize their workers further to utilize the space by implementing a rewards program to help encourage more in the office to participate. There are also opportunities to help foster a sense of teamwork within the office by challenging them to work together to achieve team goals.

According to health.gov, adults gain health benefits, such as better fitness, healthier body size and composition, when they do the equivalent of at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic physical activity (2 hours and 30 minutes) each week.

Bringing Awareness to your Employer

Employees looking to get this on the radar of their employer can talk to their human resources manager to help make their case for wellness initiatives with physical activity and the benefits associated with it.

If there is no space where physical activities can be incorporated, other initiatives such as walking meetings, taking the stairs, bike programs and company step challenges can also be implemented to give coworkers more diversity in encouraging physical activity.

Summary

The goal of any wellness initiative is to lower health costs, enhance employee engagement and reduce absenteeism and turnover. By incorporating some time for physical activity, or a space dedicated to it, employers can help influence and motivate behavioral changes, which affect daily help habits, stress and an adoption of a wellness plan of their own.

Corporate wellness starts with the employees and knowing them is essential to the success of any initiative. However, employees sharing their ideas and voicing their opinions to help get plans turned into action aids in providing their employers the knowledge they need to make the proper changes.

If your interested in bringing a wellness culture to your organization:
Check out MoveSpring, a fun and easy to use health platform for companies and organization to compete in fitness tracking challenges!

Should You Incorporate Wearables Into Your Company’s Wellness Program?

Wearables in the Workplace

Activity wearables have become tools to help promote healthier lifestyles and activity amongst users. Many now consider their days somewhat incomplete if they don’t hit their targeted daily miles or step goal.

It didn’t take long before companies begin jumping onboard in using wearables as a component of a comprehensive workplace wellness program. However, simply providing employees with these devices isn’t enough to help change health behaviors over the long term, and really, that’s the goal of any company. Typically, healthier employees translate into consistent productivity and less days missed do to sick leave.

Encouraging Participation

Aside from offering the devices or reimbursing employees of the purchase of them, implementing realistic goals to hit will make the program work by encouraging participation. Certain incentives can be set to further get more involved in the program. With any new program such as this, support is critical in helping to create new habits. Encouragement in the forms of newsletters or in-office staff is a great way to help with motivation and inspiration.

Keeping the program fresh and fun can seem like a challenge but there are numerous of ideas and themes to keep your employees active and inspired. Whether setting a collective goal, or making it competitive, the program should be one that is enjoyable and not cumbersome. Encouraging the submission of ideas, thoughts and testimonials is a great way to get first-hand knowledge of how the program is working. The testimonials can be used as a great source of inspiration around the office and the collection of ideas can help inspire new challenges to help keep things fresh.

In Summary

The goal is for the workplace practices to lead to long-term use and positive results. Wearables are only just a small part of investing into your employees overall health. While the devices are a great start, having a comprehensive strategy to encourage maximum participation is just as important.

 

If your looking for an app to help track your company’s step challenges, check out MoveSpring!

Three Factors Employers Should Consider before Structuring a Health and Wellness Program

With the New Year now here, several employers will be jumping on health and wellness initiatives. Helping to decrease the amount of time employees are on sick leave and to help increase productivity and focus. With the heightened focus on programs geared towards boosting the overall health of employees, employers might want to be smart in how they structure their wellness programs.  Here are three factors employers should focus on before rolling out any kind of program.

Communication
Before the building of any wellness can begin, it’s important for an employer to know exactly who their employees are. What their current health and activity levels are and what their goals are. For younger employees, their fitness levels and goals will be vastly different from some of the more senior employees. So it’s easy to see why they wouldn’t be incentivized and motivated with the solitary program. For large or medium-sized businesses, finding a way to sit down one-on-one with 500-plus employees isn’t feasible. A company-issued survey that targets age range, current fitness level/goals and eating habits is a great tool in helping target what employees might be good for different incentives based on the information provided.

 

Try these free online survey services:
Personalizing the Wellness Experience
With every employee’s fitness goal or activity level differing, comes the need for a more personalized experience. Wellness initiatives that are important to one employee aren’t going to be important to next. With each person’s fitness level being unique, so should his or her experience. That shouldn’t mean that there aren’t activities that can’t be done as a unit. Encouraging group activities where everyone can participate in collectively, like morning yoga or group walks, are great ways to garner more participation, and keep those needing a little boost of motivation. The values of creating a community should tie nicely to the values of the company. To help with employee activity engagement, check out MoveSpring, a fun and easy-to-use health fitness tracking platform for companies and organizations.

 

Simplicity 

With most employees already having the burdens of a daily workload and at-home tasks, employers would be wise to make sure that their program is set up so that it isn’t too complicated. Oftentimes, employers don’t see the participation levels they want due to the employees not wanting to take on anything that they feel is going to add another burden or task to their schedule. The less confusion around the initiative, the higher the participation should be.